Industry Links

 

  • BCCA Employee Benefits For over 40 years, the British Columbia Construction Association (BCCA) has proudly sponsored BCCA Employee Benefits, which has allowed BCCA members to purchase group benefits and insurance protection for their employees and their families. Our commitment to providing every Member with exceptional service and value is demonstrated in everything we do.
  • Canada BC Job Grant The Canada-B.C. Job Grant (CJG) is an employer-driven, cost-sharing program that helps employers invest in training for their current or future employees. The CJG assists eligible employers to offset the cost of training up to a maximum of $10,000 per participant per fiscal year, and up to a maximum of $15,000 per participant per fiscal year for the Unemployed Stream. The employer contributes at least one-third to the cost of training, with the exception of the Unemployed stream. The employer of all streams must have a job for the participant at the end of training.
  • Careers In Trades In many jurisdictions, it is possible to gain experience in the skilled trades or start an apprenticeship while you’re still in high school. Others come to the trades later and are making a career transition. So long as you know the trade you want to pursue and the province/territory in which you plan to work, visiting your jurisdiction’s website is a good place to start for information and guidance.
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada Every year, Canada welcomes thousands of new residents. Coming to Canada as an immigrant is an exciting opportunity, but also a great challenge. If you are interested in immigrating to Canada, you have a number of options when applying for permanent residence status. Read about these programs and decide which class suits you and your family best. A Newcomer? Introduction to Canada can help you plan your move to Canada. The guide includes advice on such things as preparing to enter the Canadian work force, choosing a place to live and learning about life in Canada.
  • Deduction for Tools (Tradespersons)
  • Discover Skills BC Discover Skills BC is an initiative funded by the BC Government to provide access for secondary students and their teachers and parents to the many educational opportunities available to them in trades and technology training. Discover Skills BC offers a wealth of programs and training options to give BC students the skills they need to lead exciting and rewarding careers. Students, parents and educators can learn more about these opportunities here.
  • Employer Tax Credits (Hiring Apprentices)
  • Skilled Trades Employment Program (STEP) STEP helps individuals remove barriers to great careers in the skilled trades.
  • Skills Canada BC Since 1994 Skills Canada British Columbia (SkillsBC) has operated as a provincial not for profit/charitable organization, working with industry, educators, government and labour to promote rewarding and in-demand skilled trade & technology careers to BC’s youth. Widely recognized for its annual 14 Olympic–style competitions hosted in communities throughout BC, Skills BC has provided tens of thousands of students with opportunities to explore skilled trades and technology careers for the past 22 years. Our unique programming allows Skills BC to position itself as an early influencer; offering youth in grades K – 12 and in post secondary, safe and engaging environments in which to explore trade & technology careers. This programming also provides our partners with the opportunity to directly network and reach approximately 30,000 students in communities across the province each year.
  • Training Tax Credit BC The training tax credit is for employers and apprentices who take part in eligible apprenticeship programs administered through the Industry Training Authority (ITA). The training tax credit is effective until the end of 2017. Budget 2017 proposes to extend the training tax credit program to the end of 2020.
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    Industry Associations

  • B.C. Construction Association represents approximately 2,000 companies in an industry that employs 140,000 British Columbians and represents 15% of the provincial GDP. Membership includes general contractors, manufacturers, suppliers and allied services, who are primarily involved in the institutional, commercial and industrial sectors.
  • B.C. Road Builders & Heavy Construction Association the B.C. Road Builders & Heavy Construction Association is the recognized advocate for a balanced, safe transportation system and infrastructure development that sustains and promotes provincial economic growth...
  • BC Construction Safety Alliance (BCCSA) Funded by industry and working for industry! The BCCSA is a non-profit organization serving construction sector 72, plus Aggregate CU 704008, and Ready-Mixed CU 712033. Providing over 40,000 employers with the best in safety program, no-cost safety training, consultation services and resources to help them improve safety for approximately 180,000 workers in B.C.
  • Buildforce Canada Originally created in 2001 as the Construction Sector Council, BuildForce Canada is a national industry-led organization committed to working with the construction industry to provide information and resources to assist with its management of workforce requirements.
  • Canadian Construction Association is the voice of Canada? largest industry. Representing the non-residential interests of an industry that employs over 880,000 Canadian men and women, and that produces $134 billion in goods and services, CCA is uniquely positioned to speak to the federal government on a wide range of issues.
  • Northern British Columbia Construction Association Northern Regional Construction Association is dedicated to the promotion of construction investment, standard practices and high standards in the construction industry from Williams Lake, nortward. The Association speaks on behalf of all sectors of the industry on construction concerns with government, design and tendering authorities and the public.
  • Southern Interior Construction Assocation is a non-profit organization with over four hundred members. We are committed to communicating information and opportunities, developing and delivering appropriate services, and supporting industry standards for the benefit of all players in our industry.
  • Vancouver Island Regional Construction Association As the Vancouver Island Construction Association (VICA), we serve our construction community: the institutional, commercial, industrial, civil, and multi-residential construction sectors on Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands, and other coastal areas of British Columbia. VICA members come from all areas of our construction community from owners, architects, and engineers to consultants and contractors. We're made up of a diverse group of individuals — women, men, young, and old — that bring unique skills and experience to the workforce. Together, we contribute to the dynamic construction industry in BC!
  • Vancouver Regional Construction Association is the advocate for the construction industry in the Lower Mainland and strives to create a stable, efficient and profitable industr. VRCA represents more than 630 general contractors, specialty trade contractors, manufacturers, suppliers and professionals active in the multi-billion dollar construction industry in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley. VRCA members are involved in all size operations from multi-national corporations to small owner/operator businesses.
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    Labour Standards

  • Alberta Employment Standards Ensuring Alberta employers and employees understand and follow employment standards.
  • B.C Employment Standards The Employment Standards Branch administers the Employment Standards Act and Regulation, which set minimum standards of wages and working conditions in most workplaces.
  • Canadian Apprenticeship Forum (CAF) Apprenticeship is a workplace-based training program that teaches people the skills they need in the trades to achieve competencies and perform tasks to the industry standard. The training combines alternating periods of on-the-job (80 to 85%) and technical training (15 to 20%). Technical training can occur at a college, a union training centre, a private trainer or online. Once the apprentice has completed the required hours and/or modules for the trade, the apprentice can write the exam for the Certificate of Qualification for the province/territory. There are many benefits to this form of training including earn while you learn, certification, good pay and exciting career opportunities.
  • Canadian Construction Documents Committee (CCDC) CCDC Documents are developed through a consultative process with representatives from all sectors in the construction industry. These consensus-based documents carry the endorsement of the four constituent national organizations.
  • Government of Canada The Canadian Government website.
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  • British Columbia Institute of Technology Architectural & Building Engineering Technology: Full-time, Diploma of Technology Automated Woodworking Processes: Full-time, Associate Certificate Boilermaking: Full-time, Certificate Carpentry: Full-time, Certificate Civil and Structural Engineering Technology: Full-time, Diploma of Technology Drafting: Full-time, Certificate of Technical Studies Forest Resources Technician: Full-time, Certificate of Technology Geographic Information Systems (GIS): Full-time/Part-time, Advanced Diploma Geomatics Engineering Technology: Full-time, Diploma of Technology Ironworking: Full-time, Certificate Joinery (Cabinetmaker) ELTT: Full-time, Certificate Painting and Decorating: Full-time, Certificate Plumbing: Full-time, Certificate Renewable Resource Management: Full-time/Part-time, Advanced Diploma Renewable Resources (Fish, Wildlife and Recreation / Forestry): Full-time, Diploma of Technology Sheet Metal Working: Full-time, Certificate Steamfitting: Full-time, Certificate Steel Fabricating: Full-time, Certificate Welding, Level A: Full-time, Certificate Welding, Level B: Full-time, Certificate Welding, Level C: Full-time, Certificate
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